How to Save Money on Insulin with Copay Cards

How to Save Money on Insulin with Copay Cards


If you live with insulin-dependent diabetes in the US, you know how expensive insulin can be, even if you have insurance.

But did you know that most insulin manufacturers have copay cards that can significantly reduce your co-pay? Or in some cases even eliminate it completely?

What’s a copay card

Copay cards have been around in the US for a long time and are a way for the manufacturers to reduce the copay you usually pay at the pharmacy. Anyone can visit a manufacturer’s website and download a copay card, but different rules may apply and some copay cards are only valid in combination with commercial insurance.

Unfortunately, you cannot use copay cards in combination with any government program such as Medicare or Medicaid due to federal anti-kickback laws.

How copay cards work

Most copay cards can be downloaded directly from the insulin manufacturer’s website and they will often also offer to mail them to you. You then show the copay card to your pharmacist and he/she will run it for you. If you use an online pharmacy, you’ll have to call them and give them the details that are on the front of the card.

After your pharmacist adds the card to your prescription, the final copay will be calculated and you’ll pay your reduced price and be on your way.

Let’s look at an example of how a copay card can save you money. I will use the Levemir copay card as an example since that is what I use myself.

Note: the exact cost and savings can be different depending on your individual situation and where you live.

Example of savings

I use Novo Nordisk Levemir as my basal insulin and I have commercial insurance. I get the Levemir in boxes of 5 pens.

  • Without insurance, Levemir can cost well over $500 for a box
  • After insurance, my copay is $60 per box
  • The copay card reduces the copay to $45 but with a $100 max saving
  • With the copay card, I therefore pay $45, a saving of $15 per box of 5 pens

If my copay was higher, the copay card would save me even more money:

  • If my copay was $100, I would still only pay $45 with the copay card, a saving of $55
  • If my copay was $200, I would pay $100 with the copay card (because the max saving is $100), a saving of $100

If I didn’t have insurance at all, I would be able to apply for a different copay card (the Novocare program) that would provide me with a 30-day supply of insulin for $99 (for up to 12 months.) 

Each manufacturer and program has it’s own terms, conditions, and savings so it’s important to read the terms carefully or contact the manufacturer directly for more information.

How to get an insulin copay card

Below you can find copay cards for most insulins and other common injectables used to manage diabetes. If you don’t see the brand you use here, try to search for it online. For example, search “Humalog copay card” in Google if you use Humalog insulin.

Please note that these programs change frequently so this information may not always be up to date. Check with your pharmacy to see your final co-pay. Diabetes Strong is not liable for the actual price you’re charged.

Manufacturer Brand name Cost with card Coverage Link
Eli Lilly Basaglar $5
up to $150 covered $1800 annually
Commercial insurance Click Here
Eli Lilly Humalog (includes mixed Lilly insulin) $35 Commercial insurance and no insurance Call (833) 808-1234
Eli Lilly Humulin R U-500 $25 Commercial insurance Click Here
Eli Lilly Trulicity $25
Up to $150 covered
Commercial insurance Click Here
MannKind Afrezza $15 Commercial insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Levemir $45
Up to $100 covered
Commercial insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Levemir $99 per month No insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Fiasp $45
Up to $100 covered
Commercial insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Fiasp $99 per month No insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Novolog
(includes mixed Novo insulin)
$45
Up to $100 covered
Commercial insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Novolog (includes mixed Novo insulin) $99 per month No insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Ozempic $25
Up to $150 covered
Commercial insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Tresiba $5
Up to $150 covered
Commercial insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Tresiba $99 per month No insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Victoza $45
Up to $100 covered
Commercial insurance Click Here
Novo Nordisk Xultophy $30
Up to $400 covered
Commercial insurance Click Here
Sanofi Admelog $99 per month No insurance Click Here
Sanofi Apidra $0
Up to $100 covered
Commercial insurance Click Here
Sanofi Apidra $99 per month No insurance Click Here
Sanofi Lantus $0
No more than $99
Commercial insurance Click Here
Sanofi Lantus $99 per month No insurance Click Here
Sanofi Toujeo $0
No more than $99
Commercial insurance Click Here
Sanofi Toujeo $99 per month No insurance Click Here

Financial assistance programs

Copay cards are a great start, but if you find that you still cannot afford your insulin, you can consider applying for financial assistance programs through the manufacturers.

The programs have different eligibility requirements, such as household income. Please refer to the individual program to see if you qualify.

Don’t pay more for insulin than you have to!



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